Logic, but in a different way

Daft Logic

List of the Power Consumption of Typical Household Appliances

Last Updated 12th May 2008

Turn that TV off if you're not watching it! It's wasting electrically!

How much electricity is it really wasting?, and would it not be better to switch off the 4 lights in the room?

The best way to compare the cost of running different appliances is to look at their power consumption, which is measure of how much power they use in Watts. The following list points out typical values for the wattage of some devices you would find in your home so that you can compare them.

Appliance Minimum Maximum
100W light bulb 100W 100W
25" colour TV 150W 150W
3" belt sander 1000W 1000W
60W light bulb 60W 60W
9" disc sander 1200W 1200W
Ceiling Fan 10W 50W
Clock radio 1W 2W
Clothes dryer 4000W 4000W
Desktop Computer 50W 150W
Dishwasher 1200W 1500W
Electric Blanket 200W 200W
Electric Kettle 2000W 2000W
Electric Mower 1500W 1500W
Electric Shaver 15W 20W
Fridge / Freezer 500W 500W
Hair Blow dryer 1000W 1000W
Home Air Conditioner 1000W 1000W
Iron 1000W 1000W
Laptop Computer 20W 50W
Lawnmower 1000W 1400W
Microwave 600W 1500W
Oven 2150W 2150W
Power Shower 240W 240W
Strimmer 300W 500W
Submersible Water Pump 400W 400W
Table Fan 10W 25W
Toaster 800W 1500W
TV (19" colour) 70W 100W
Vacuum Cleaner 200W 700W
Washing Machine 500W 500W
Water Feature 35W 35W

An important point is also to bare in mind the length of time for which the device will be used. For example an electric blanket may be used for 2 hours, but a hair drier for 5 minutes. Therefore the blanket uses 200W * 2 hours = 0.4kWh. The hair drier uses 1KW * 0.0833hours = 0.08333 kWh. So using the blanket costs roughly 5 times as much as the hair drier.

All values reported here are estimates, you should check the appliance labels or literature to find out the correct power consumption.

Previous Comments For This Page

susil -ญญ> ton are A.C. chill output. 1000W input power is typical for home a.c. unit.
By Blor on 29/07/2014
power rating of air conditioner is wrong,actually a.c rated on ton i.e 1ton is approximately equal to 3500w.
By susil (MSIL,U-2) on 22/07/2014
As I required
By mohanta on 13/07/2014
Thank u for this information.
By ITADARE DUPE on 13/07/2014
Tnk u vry much
By thumar lalji on 10/07/2014
JEBRINE, there is no time aspect to the list. If you want to factor in time to transform the KW to KWh, then just multiply the decimal number of hours.
By Daft Logic on 09/07/2014
in what basis you present this present this list? per day or per hour?
By JEBRINE MELCO.A on 09/07/2014
I m fully satisfied with this information.now i will save more electricity than before.
By hardev singh on 02/07/2014
Thank u for making us aware
By Neelam on 29/06/2014
thx g so f'ing helpful
By cameron henderson on 25/06/2014
good info
By sid on 24/06/2014
Nice information
By Sindhu on 24/06/2014
great information i wonder can you include those led lights that are fitted to a lot of home items I have 15 in total which light up 24/7 thanks
By tommy s on 24/06/2014
great thing to know all this ! tanx
By prashant on 19/06/2014
This data is highly but we know misleading data can be more than the data which computer age can be capable of meaning thereby that we cannot always keep faith on unreliable and false belief.
By Logician on 10/06/2014
Nice. We Can save power by knowing this.
On 08/06/2014
thankyou
On 08/06/2014
thanks
By PRAGYA on 06/06/2014
It is very usseful information for everybody. It really added to my knowledge.
By Ch. Muhammad Younis on 04/06/2014
thankqq
By ali on 03/06/2014
thank you very much
On 31/05/2014
Thanks, it was useful for me
On 30/05/2014
Hi YouBlinds, can you give examples of data that is old or unreliable? We are happy to make any updates.
By Daft Logic on 30/05/2014
Old and unreliable data... Look, the last date the data got updated is year 2008. That's a VERY long time in technology years.
By YouBlinds? on 29/05/2014
thanks
By sibte hasan kazmi on 25/05/2014
thanks. this thing is very helpful
On 21/05/2014
This is infact incorrect.
On 13/05/2014
its very useful. i completed my project only because of this
By Raj Mistry on 05/05/2014
thak
On 22/04/2014
Power rating of ceiling fan is wrong..max it can go upto 150 w
By surya on 10/04/2014

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